Christmas Not So Bright

While we all look forward to celebrating in a few days time, we are ever mindful of the plight of some of the old folk in Zim who have very little to celebrate at all. The report below was sent to us by one of the ZANE carers and highlights once again the desperate situation that people find themselves in:

Simon

I interviewed and assessed Simon, having been referred to us by another charity. Simon is currently living with a friend, who had contacted the other charity, advising that Simon is destitute and ill and needing help.

When I arrived, he was sitting in a bare, tatty lounge in the only chair, bent over and dishevelled in a dressing gown. I found that Simon had only been able to get up and walk a few hours earlier and had just shaved off a long beard.

His hair has grown to below his shoulders and was matted, dirty, and partly in his eyes. He struggled to get up to greet me but failed and fell back into his chair.

In summary, this was a difficult interview for me because Simon found it hard to talk, even answering basic questions such as “when did you last work, where were you living before coming here”?

His daughter arrived and helped with some of the information, but even she was vague and unsure about how her father landed up being as physically and mentally ill as he is now.

Apparently, he went without food for 43 days before he came to Harare and ended up being admitted to the hospital with life-threatening malnutrition. He is obviously slowly gaining weight and having more energy now, but still appears very ill.

His daughter earns very little, so this small household is barely making ends meet. I talked with them all for over an hour, trying to make sense of their stories, gave Simon US$100 and a food parcel (plus EPAP), and told them I will be contacting them regarding how we may be able to help them.

For now, this will just be a food parcel.


PLEASE DONATE TO SUPPORT PENSIONERS STRUGGLING TO SURVIVE IN ZIMBABWE

Any assistance is greatly appreciated and goes a long way to giving our pensioners a better quality of life and lift the pressure of money worries which is very debilitating emotionally.

(Donations made to ZANE in Australia, are tax-deductible)

Fred

I went to assess a new couple at their flat. They find themselves in a typical Zimbabwe pensioners’ situation, where they have worked and saved hard all their lives, until the Zimbabwe dollar devalued and their savings were converted to Zimbabwe currency overnight, reducing their savings dramatically.

Fred served with the forces and we were able to get him a small grant from this and he is very grateful for his bi-annual grant, however with the increased cost of living and medical expenses, this allowance is simply not enough.

He suffers from a heart condition amongst other ailments which require a lot of medication. ZANE is going to assist this couple with their monthly rent and continue to give them a food parcel – these are such life-saving things we can offer people and we are so grateful to have access to them even when we cannot help financially.

Jim

My visit to Jim was not an easy one. He is not well, although he said he has felt a lot better during the past fortnight. Jim has been told by his doctor that he is going into renal failure and should be in the hospital.

He was depressed and very agitated, saying he was tired and had enough, I fear Jim is giving up.

I will keep visiting as much as I can – poor old chap.


PLEASE DONATE TO SUPPORT PENSIONERS STRUGGLING TO SURVIVE IN ZIMBABWE

Any assistance is greatly appreciated and goes a long way to giving our pensioners a better quality of life and lift the pressure of money worries which is very debilitating emotionally.

(Donations made to ZANE in Australia, are tax-deductible)

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